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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
. rich: they are not offering very many specifics this early on. we do have a ways to go. john boehner did offer framework. the framework would have tax and entitlement targets, revenue targets, spending targets, that this year in the next couple months. congress would work out the details in 2013. both leaders from both parties and both houses say it is time to get to work. >> we will continue to have revenue on the table. we are serious. we are serious about cutting spending and solving our fiscal problems. >> we will do it now. we feel very comfortable with each other. this is not something we will wait until the last day of december to get it done. rich: they met for a little longer than an hour here at the white house. much of the talk was positive. there really is not anything close to specifics right now coming from anyone in all of this. here he read and nancy pelosi really did not mention entitlement at all. rich o'connell highlighted the fact that his conference in the senate believes that this country does not have a taxing problem, it has a spending problem. there are still
back and forth. you had boehner's position from the -- >> i don't want to anger the viewers, you but i think they're looking at obama's words the same way they look it at the polls with the kind of sense of here's what i want to believe. >> if they lose, do they go along with that and say we will accept that or do they push it over the fiscal cliff. you have people on the right and the left who are saying go over. >> in the press conference yesterday, my read of what obama said was we're raising the rates and we're put a structure for eliminating entitlements. >> correct. but if we're talking about rates, if you were playing joe, you would hear that the argument would be that this will never actually work. republicans won't go loochialon it. so some people were suggesting maybe there is a way to do 35% and get rid of deductions. >> but remember was it geithner on -- today is thursday. so this would have been tuesday. he said people are diluting themselves to think we can get where we need to get with loopholes. and i don't know about the right max, but my understanding is i don't think
.6 trillion of new revenue. boehner had agreed to $800 billion. it's not hard to find $1.2 trillion as a kind of middle ground to that. then you want to have $4 trillion of total deficit reduction, so that leaves $2.8 trillion of spending reductions that have to happen. here's what people miss. we can avoid going over the cliff with the stroke of a pen. they can just extend all this stuff and kick the can down the road. the real question is are we going to have a big deal? are we going to agree on the major spending restraints that we need as well as the tax stuff in order to actually get the deficit under control? and i think the betting on that is less than 50%. i think we have a great shot at it. but it's going to be really, really hard. >> is that the view from wall street, too? they're not totally confident that this is going to happen? >> what you see in the stock market at the moment is that wall street is not totally confident. that's for sure. >> all right. steve, thanks so much. >> pleasure. >>> coming up, independent senator-elect of maine, angus king joins the conversation. he's a
cuts for social security, medicare and medicaid. john boehner says we will talk more tax revenue in an overall tax system but we won't discuss without entitlement reform. that is the key for republicans. they will do tax revenue but it has got to be part of an overhaul of the tax system and has to involve medicare, medicaid and social security. exactly what, folks. but white house don't want to. melissa: leaders in d.c. are scrambling to figure this out but our first guest says he really does fear we're going to hit the fiscal cliff. think of while e. coyote and the acme parachute. scott hodge is president of the tax foundation. you are well known for innovative ideas on tax policy. in the 1990s you campaign to include a child credit in capital gains tax cuts. what is your best idea this time around? >> the best idea right now is for everybody to take a deep breath and pumped into next year. all the tax cuts should be extended for one more year to give congress and the white house some extra time to get off of their political posturing and make a rational deal between them. this
of the fact that they're worried about what's not going to happen. after the election, boehner came out, thought he'd move some, and then obama came out the next day, and in the early part of his speech, he looked good. and all of a sudden he starts digging in. if you look at what the stock market did, it immediately dropped. came back a little bit that day, but immediately dropped. that's what's in people's minds and it's scaring the heck out of them. we have to have some solution. >> when we look to europe, it's a very similar scenario. we have all these issues revolving around greece and maybe to a lesser extent, spain, and it seems about the same dynamics. that it isn't results oriented, it's idle the car and hope things get better while you're sitting in there, hunkered down. >> that's absolutely the case. they have been spinning their wheels. fortunately for us, we've gotten away from the european situation, somewhat. because it looks like our economy can gain some traction. but it's immediately going to grind to a halt if we don't see something. >> you know, there's one area, the
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)